Issue: “Issue No. 15 – Distributed Team Management”

The Agile Theory of General Relativity – Agile has a Manifesto. It’s about time we had a universal truth.

The results of [a] previous investigation lead to a very interesting conclusion, which is here to be deduced [1]. It has been shown in several ‘previous investigations’ that inherent in agile projects there are story points delivered over a progression of time with a relatively steady flow of money spent. What is worth considering is the nature of that relationship, and whether it is a predictable relationship.

If we imagine one factor is the cumulative duration of all the project time-boxes, and a second factor is the progressive expenditure that ultimately funds the work, then we can posit a third factor that represents the work being delivered.

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OWASP Security in a Continuous Integration World

This article discusses techniques used to confront web vulnerabilities using open source tools in the agile world. These experiences might not reflect the practices followed within MIMOS Berhad and may be the author’s own interpretation. It has been a legacy

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Thoughts on Distributed Teams

Right after my first cup of coffee, I log in to the company server from my kitchen table. I read my email and get myself another cup of coffee. Then I take a look at the issue management tool to see if the testers in Bangalore found many bugs while I was sleeping. I also check the online Scrum board to see the progress of the Sydney development team. While reading, a Skype call comes in and the team lead from Bangalore wants to talk. After talking for 15 minutes, I am fully updated on the testing done last night. The dashboard tells me development is on schedule and the nightly build of the interfaces was successful. This will be a productive day. I take another cup of coffee while I upload the latest documentation onto the server and prepare the meeting with the teams in Brazil and California later today …

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Key Challenges for Agile in Distributed Environments

Running agile Scrum in a distributed team is like trying to cook the world’s most delicious recipe without seasonings. It is easier to work with a co-located team rather than a team distributed across the world. A distributed team’s biggest challenges are related to communication gaps and cultural differences. Using Scrum in a distributed team will not help in removing these challenges; it will only help you discover and mitigate them faster.

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Collaboration in Distributed Teams

Many organizations currently grapple with the reality of delivering software projects in which the sub-teams are located in different geographical locations, but the final project should be delivered by one team comprised of the sub-teams. This article focuses on how organizations can continue to practice agile in a distributed team environment while dealing with scenarios that are unique to distributed teams.

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Managing Distributed Teams

Businesses are shifting their workforce to emerging economies like Russia, China, India, or the Philippines due to reduced business operations costs and the availability of skilled labor. To put it more precisely, tomorrow’s business will be more virtual and distributed, with distribution its key element. Henceforth, the need for better team management, using the right tools and processes, becomes critical for any enterprise company.

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By the way …

It has been a really nice day. For the first time in weeks, the sun did not hide behind gray clouds and Jack could use his favorite T-shirt again, the one that said, “I don’t make stupid mistakes, only very clever ones”.

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Integrating Test Activities in Agile Projects

People not working in agile sometimes have the impression that agile projects are chaotic, disorganized, and uncontrolled. Indeed, if discipline and structure are really lacking, an agile project will deliver poor quality software or will not deliver at all!
A proven approach to measure quality is product testing. However, both the Agile Manifesto [1] and Schwaber and Sutherland’s Definitive Guide to Scrum [2] leave few clues on how to do that.
After addressing the lack of concrete steps on testing in agile and Scrum approaches, we describe our vision for agile testing, followed by suggestions for effectively integrating test activities into the Scrum approach.

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Agile Testing: where does the community meet?

The “agile era” began in February 2001, high in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah (USA), with the creation of the “Manifesto for Agile Software Development”. Seventeen software professionals were involved in deciding upon principles and values that should serve to improve the software development community.

Agile Testing Days 2013 logoThese ideas immediately trickled quickly from the mountains into the valleys of the USA, and it was not long until the trend of agile thinking began to enter the workplaces of Europe, especially throughout Germany. What began as “agile hype” or “the agile movement” is now known after twelve years as the “agile lifestyle”. This agile lifestyle is today not only practiced in the software industry, but also in many other industries across the globe.

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Increasing the Effectiveness of Stand-up Meetings

Regularly conducting project meetings is an accepted best practice, as it brings team members together face-to-face, increasing collaboration and indirectly achieving mutual support. It is during meetings that team members have an opportunity to get the holistic view of what is going on beyond their own deadlines and deliverables. Daily team meetings increase the level of collaboration, enhancing the intrateam support needed to achieve the common goals of project execution.

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